Importance of the circle in horsemanship

The Circle is Important! by Donna Snyder-Smith Circles are important The unassuming circle is an important geometric figure in dressage. It is also one of your most important training tools to teach or improve the following in your horse: lateral suppleness, balance, flexion of the hind leg joints (inside...

The Ugly Duckling Dressage Score, the ‘Insufficient’ 4

The Ugly Duckling Dressage Score, the 'Insufficient' 4 By Donna Snyder-Smith The NAWD organization has always taken its obligation to the horse as its basic and most serious concern.  In recognizing and accepting that some elements of training, especially when ridden precisely and in close proximity produce a stronger,...

NAWD Newsletter April 2017

Enjoy!  Click here to receive future newsletters from NAWD Message from Jen Hello! Welcome to the newly re-launched NAWD Newsletter. Take a look around and see what's happening at NAWD and in the horse world this month. NAWD member Jen Mandel sits down with us for a chat and...

NAWD Professional Profile: Jen Mandel

Jen Mandel: Cedar Hill Ranch, Durham, Connecticut (860) 682-0325 cedarhillranch.net Meet Jen Mandel! Jen Mandel from Durhan, CT, has been riding for years and recently found western dressage as a logical part of the growth and progression of her horse, Purely Unforgettable, and Appendix Quarter horse mare. Read on...

Giving Groundwork the Credit it Deserves by Lindsey Buhrmann

Giving groundwork the credit it deserves Groundwork is an equalizer. If you practice – regardless of equine conformation or style – you can do well. That said, many equestrians don’t practice it enough, often because they are pressed for time and want to ride (I get it!). Let’s give...

Western Dressage Collection for Second Level

Moving to Second Level -Western Dressage Collection by Donna Snyder-Smith For Western dressage riders the collection asked for at second level could prove to be a stumbling block. Historically “collection” in the western horse gaits has been interpreted as a slowing of the horse through a reduction of energy...